Annotated Bibliography

Beck, Evelyn Torton. “Kahlo’s World Split Open.” Feminist

 

Studies. no. 1 (2006): 54-81.

 

Beck speaks about Frida’s complicated life. She talks about

 

Frida’s stormy marriage with Diego Rivera, her traumatic

 

accident and wounds, and her illness, all of which were

 

incorporated into her paintings. After she died, her work

 

disappeared from public view. She was rediscovered by

 

feminist scholars in the Second Wave of the women’s

 

movement and has become an “icon” with a wide audience.

 

Frida Kahlo, Las Dos Fridas, 1939. Oil, 173.5 x 173 cm.

 

Museum of Modern Art Mexico City, Mexico.

 

This is one of Kahlo’s self-portraits that she painted. The

 

painting shows two versions of teh artist sitting side by

 

side,with both of their hands exposed. One Frida is dressed

 

nearly all in white and has a damaged heart and spots of

 

blood on her clothing. The other wears bold colored

 

clothing and has an intact heart. These figures are

 

believed to represent the “unloved” and “loved” versions of

 

Kahlo.

 

PBS, “Understanding Frida Today.” Last modified 2005.

 

Accessed September 24, 2013,

 

http://www.pbs.org/weta/fridakahlo/today/.

 

This document about Frida Kahlo talks about the kind of

 

woman she was. It talks about her character and how she

 

expressed herself through her paintings. Frida is a woman

 

who flaunted her defects and was proud of her “manly”

 

features.

 

Tibol, Raquel. Frida Kahlo: An Open Life. Albuquerque:

 

University of New Mexico Press, 1993.

 

Tibol’s book uses Kahlo’s personal medical records,

 

journals, letters, interviews, and personal recollections

 

in order to truly see into Frida’s life and her darkest

 

inner feelings. This book dives a lot deeper into Frida’s

 

life and makes it easier to understand who she was as a

 

women.

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